• Connecting Speakers with Audiences™

The Business of Speaking

Presentation lessons from Disney’s Jungle Cruise

Presentation lessons from Disney’s Jungle Cruise 1707 2560 I Need A Speaker

Some things just make summer feel more like … well, summer. Sprinklers. Bike riding. Shore taffy. One of my favorites is the drive-in.

Our local drive-in was showing Jungle Cruise, so we invited our daughter and her friends to enjoy the show outdoors. The opening scene featured Jack Whitehall as MacGregor Houghton, delivering a speech to an unfriendly crowd.

Playing the brother of lead Emily Blunt, Whitehall was requesting that his theatrical sister be granted access to a valued and protected archive.

Nervous, he read aloud from the notecards the requestor had provided. At one point, he read every word on the card, including “Pause for dramatic effect.” Blushing, he continued on, but the audience wasn’t amused.

Another notecard said, “If it goes sideways, go to plan B.”

As the kids munched popcorn, I reflected on the scene’s lessons:

  • Be prepared for your presentations.
  • Practice. Practice. Practice.
  • Yes, pause for dramatic effect, but don’t read the directive.
  • Have a plan B if plan A isn’t working.
  • Know your audience.

How would you handle a not-so-friendly crowd?

 

 

Photo credit: John Cheathem from Pexels

Channel this habit from rock stars to enhance your presentations

Channel this habit from rock stars to enhance your presentations 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

I’ve been a fan of Styx (and most rock and roll) ever since I can remember. The first notes of certain songs take me back to fun memories and special times, and those songs tend to be the ones I play on repeat.

I’m not the only one who has stories associated with songs. At a recent Styx concert, band members would introduce songs by telling stories about what inspired the songs or what was happening when the songs were written. Hearing those anecdotes made me feel closer to the band and its music. Rock legends Tom Petty and Bon Jovi did the same thing, and the stories added so much depth to the show.

Something to think about: How can you incorporate stories into your message to make it more memorable and meaningful?

 

 

Photo credit: Tricia Richards-Service

Aren’t we all speakers?

Aren’t we all speakers? 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

I Need A Speaker is on Clubhouse! Hosted by Tricia Richards-Service and Christopher Pahoski, the room was open for people who want to learn more about getting started in public speaking.

Some people have said, “I’m not a speaker. In fact, I’m rarely in front of an audience.” We responded that the size of the audience isn’t as relevant as the opportunity to deliver value to people.

When you make a presentation in your department meeting … you’re a speaker. When you make a toast at a special occasion … you’re a speaker. When you respond to questions in a job interview … you’re a speaker. If you have a message to share … you’re a speaker.

You get the idea.

Whether we are involved in a one-on-one conversation, a small group meeting, or a conference, we all have the opportunity to collect our thoughts, consider our audience, and deliver value.

 

We’d love to hear examples of how information was powerful because it was shared. Send your stories to info@ineedaspeaker.com.

 

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Public speaking notes from Dale Carnegie

Public speaking notes from Dale Carnegie 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

“Thinking people want to be led, not driven. They want to have the facts presented and to draw their own conclusions. They like to be asked questions, not to have a ceaseless stream of direct statements poured at them.”

— Dale Carnegie, Public Speaking for Success

 

 

We want to lead, not drive. What topics do you want to read about in our blog? E-mail info@ineedaspeaker.com with your suggestions.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Gig worker. Cancel culture. Second gentleman. What do these phrases have in common?

Gig worker. Cancel culture. Second gentleman. What do these phrases have in common? 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Have you figured out what those phrases have in common? They were all among the 520 new terms that were added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in January 2021. (Read more of them by clicking here.)

Yes, you read that right. In one month, more than 500 new words were added to our constantly changing vocabulary.

With so much rapid change in the way we communicate, it’s more important than ever to define unfamiliar terms.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Enjoy our chat on the TrillMBA podcast

Enjoy our chat on the TrillMBA podcast 2560 1440 I Need A Speaker

Recently, the founder of I Need A Speaker was asked to be a guest on the Trill MBA podcast. Tricia Richards-Service was thrilled to talk with host Felicia Ann Rose Enuha about I Need A Speaker and the power of public speaking.

Click here to listen and learn.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Update your profile and enhance your credibility

Update your profile and enhance your credibility 2560 1709 I Need A Speaker

We love promoting our international speaker community and sharing our  speakers’ accomplishments. We need your help to do it even better.

When you celebrate another achievement, tell us! We will add the information to our newsletter and social media content.

Regularly update your profile with news of awards, speaking engagements, degrees, certificates, licenses, and other awards or credentials.

Congratulations on all you’ve done. We can’t wait to see what you do next.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Make sure time is on your side

Make sure time is on your side 2560 1930 I Need A Speaker

Event planners juggle many responsibilities. They want to be sure that everything works well for the events they plan.

One crucial element in planning is time. Speakers are typically booked for a set time frame. In the planning stages, event planners will review the length of time allocated for each speaker.

Speakers who complete their presentations with time to spare may cause a problem, because they will affect the schedule for the remainder of the event. The same is true when they speak too long.

When practicing, speakers need to time themselves. It’s important to respect the time frame they have been given and do their part to help make the event run smoothly.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Yes, we do recommend practicing with distractions

Yes, we do recommend practicing with distractions 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Most public presentation coaches will emphasize the need to practice before speaking in front of a live audience.

Some speakers will claim that it’s difficult for them to find a quiet place to practice their speech without interruption.

Surprise! You may be better suited to a space with distraction.

Why? Practicing amidst noise and movement may actually prepare you better for the live gigs. While you’re speaking at an event, there may be background noice during virtual presentations. At live talks, there may be cell phones ringing or doors opening and closing as people come and go.

Knowing how to stay focus amidst distraction will help when you’re speaking live. Try it.

 

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Booking an international speaker? Here’s what you need to know.

Booking an international speaker? Here’s what you need to know. 2560 1696 I Need A Speaker

We are thrilled to welcome international speakers to our directory!

If you’re considering booking someone from another country, keep these tips in mind:

  • Plan around the time difference. A great meeting time in the United States might mean your speaker joins the event at midnight in his or her home country. Choose a time that’s most convenient for everyone in attendance.
  • Realize there may be additional fees for currency exchange, depending on your payment method. Compensate accordingly.
  • Know and maintain cultural practices from the speaker’s home country.
  • Avoid using slang. People who speak a non-native language well may not know current slang terminology from other places.
  • Don’t reference stereotypes about the speaker’s home country. These stereotypes may be hurtful.
  • Use active listening to ensure the proper messages are heard.
  • If you have a bilingual or multilingual presentation, use interpreters as needed.
  • Help your speaker be as comfortable as possible. Ensure that he or she has a clear understanding of the event, the talk, the audience, and your expectations.
  • Enjoy the experience of getting to know someone from another part of the world!

 

Photo credit: Pexels

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