• Connecting Speakers with Audiences™

practice

Make sure time is on your side

Make sure time is on your side 2560 1930 I Need A Speaker

Event planners juggle many responsibilities. They want to be sure that everything works well for the events they plan.

One crucial element in planning is time. Speakers are typically booked for a set time frame. In the planning stages, event planners will review the length of time allocated for each speaker.

Speakers who complete their presentations with time to spare may cause a problem, because they will affect the schedule for the remainder of the event. The same is true when they speak too long.

When practicing, speakers need to time themselves. It’s important to respect the time frame they have been given and do their part to help make the event run smoothly.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Yes, we do recommend practicing with distractions

Yes, we do recommend practicing with distractions 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Most public presentation coaches will emphasize the need to practice before speaking in front of a live audience.

Some speakers will claim that it’s difficult for them to find a quiet place to practice their speech without interruption.

Surprise! You may be better suited to a space with distraction.

Why? Practicing amidst noise and movement may actually prepare you better for the live gigs. While you’re speaking at an event, there may be background noice during virtual presentations. At live talks, there may be cell phones ringing or doors opening and closing as people come and go.

Knowing how to stay focus amidst distraction will help when you’re speaking live. Try it.

 

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Check the link. An error can lock out your audience.

Check the link. An error can lock out your audience. 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Dafna Gold Melchior – one of our wonderful speakers – recently posted this on LinkedIn. With her permission we’re sharing this message:

“Check the link. Double check the link. Otherwise you could discover that your esteemed guests were sent somewhere else…

I delivered a workshop last night, on behalf of an organization. 150 people signed up via a production company, which sent them an invite with a link. I was in the Zoom room early, checked sound and share screen with the helpful tech person.

At a few minutes to the hour, we started wondering why no one was joining… Turned out the production company had mistakenly sent the wrong link…

By the time I too was sent the (wrong) link my audience had received, there were 8 people left (5 with cameras off). So three lucky people received my workshop, and I assure you I gave them my all, as I would have with 150 participants.

I’m sharing this to spare you the same frustrating experience. I beg you, have those who handle logistics on your behalf check and re-check the link.”

Follow her advice.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Why Clubhouse may be your best training resource

Why Clubhouse may be your best training resource 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

Clubhouse is one of the most popular new social media apps. Currently available to iPhone users only, Clubhouse describes itself as “a new type of social network based on voice—where people around the world come together to talk, listen and learn from each other in real time.”

As of 1 February 2021, Clubhouse has 2 million users. I haven’t turned off my Clubhouse notifications, and my phone regularly lights up with mentions of current, new, or scheduled “rooms.” As a user, I can drop into these rooms and listen to a discussion or raise my hand to participate. I can create my own room solo or with other people.

So what’s the appeal for someone who is a public speaker? There are several benefits, actually … networking, learning, promoting yourself. But today I want to focus on a really important benefit that’s especially beneficial for emerging public speakers: practice.

If you’re anxious about public speaking or feel like you need to speak more confidently, take the Clubhouse “stage” and share your thoughts. The tone of the app is an informal, using a pop-in-quietly-and-leave-quietly design. Schedule your own room on a topic you know well, or raise your hand in someone else’s room to contribute.

You’ll have the opportunity to receive valuable feedback. And when people ask questions, that tells you what information you might want to include when speaking in front of a live audience.

When you do this with regularity, you’ll refine your message, obtain more experience in delivering it, and advance your public speaking goals.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

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