• Connecting Speakers with Audiences™

public presentation

Ways to wow during class presentations

Ways to wow during class presentations 2560 1709 I Need A Speaker

Whether you’re preparing a presentation in the first couple weeks of school (yes, it happens), or giving a quick self introduction, we’re here to help you nail your image and give the best possible impression when addressing your group. 

Be confident, but maintain likability and friendliness throughout your presentation. It’s doubtful to hold the attention of an audience if you appear frightened or unsure of the information you’re providing. Even if you are well versed in a subject, adjust your tone to ensure you aren’t giving your audience a condescending vibe. 

  1. Be prepared. In some classes or groups, the instructor may ask you to share some details about yourself. Why not take this opportunity to prepare a short description of what you want to be known for? Think outside the box – talking about what excites you, what you like to do, what accomplishments you have, and other personal traits that define you can make you a more engaging speaker.
  2. If you’re giving a thorough discussion or presentation on a specific topic, be sure you are establishing credibility throughout your presentation. Cite reputable sources, and be prepared to answer questions. Using fascinating and creative sources can engage your audience to take interest in your presentation.
  3. Be engaged in your own topic. Sounds like a no-brainer, but always show excitement and interest in your subject area. Use impactful slides to share your content (but don’t read them to the audience), and use positive body language to reinforce your excitement on the topic. Nobody would give much credence to a speaker who has their hands in their pockets, or one who doesn’t appear to care about their own presentation.
  4. Bring a professional image. Your appearance and image are important to delivering a notable and authentic presentation experience. This includes maintaining a polished appearance, appropriate clothing (see our previous blog post about dressing for presentations). Dressing well is a good way to show your audience that you care about your subject matter, and that you value their time in your presentation. 

While this is not an all-inclusive list for presenters, it’s a great foundation to start with for building your presentation skills. Building presentation and communication skills is a great practice to start now, and continue to develop throughout your academic, and soon-to-come professional career. 

I Need A Speaker sincerely wishes all students, parents, and educators a safe and successful academic year. 

 

Photo credit: Photo by Mikhail Nilov from Pexels 

Hey, students! You can benefit from our class presentation tips!

Hey, students! You can benefit from our class presentation tips! 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

It’s time to buy notebooks and load backpacks for the academic year. As a student, your preparation should go beyond that. To succeed in your classes, you may want to give thought to how you will present when you’re called upon to do so.

Your remarks could be from your seat as you answer questions, or it could be in front of a class or auditorium. Regardless of how many people are in the room, you’ll want to demonstrate strong presentation skills. These include:

  • Having a clear objective for what you want to share.
  • Researching when necessary.
  • Collecting and organizing your thoughts.
  • Sharing stories or examples.
  • Speaking with confidence.
  • Being open to questions and alternative views.

For the next two weeks, we’ll be delivering student-focused content to help you succeed. Do you have a question about class presentations? Ask us! Drop a note to info@ineedaspeaker.com.

 

Photo credit: Photo by Stanley Morales from Pexels 

Presentation lessons from Disney’s Jungle Cruise

Presentation lessons from Disney’s Jungle Cruise 1707 2560 I Need A Speaker

Some things just make summer feel more like … well, summer. Sprinklers. Bike riding. Shore taffy. One of my favorites is the drive-in.

Our local drive-in was showing Jungle Cruise, so we invited our daughter and her friends to enjoy the show outdoors. The opening scene featured Jack Whitehall as MacGregor Houghton, delivering a speech to an unfriendly crowd.

Playing the brother of lead Emily Blunt, Whitehall was requesting that his theatrical sister be granted access to a valued and protected archive.

Nervous, he read aloud from the notecards the requestor had provided. At one point, he read every word on the card, including “Pause for dramatic effect.” Blushing, he continued on, but the audience wasn’t amused.

Another notecard said, “If it goes sideways, go to plan B.”

As the kids munched popcorn, I reflected on the scene’s lessons:

  • Be prepared for your presentations.
  • Practice. Practice. Practice.
  • Yes, pause for dramatic effect, but don’t read the directive.
  • Have a plan B if plan A isn’t working.
  • Know your audience.

How would you handle a not-so-friendly crowd?

 

 

Photo credit: John Cheathem from Pexels

Channel this habit from rock stars to enhance your presentations

Channel this habit from rock stars to enhance your presentations 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

I’ve been a fan of Styx (and most rock and roll) ever since I can remember. The first notes of certain songs take me back to fun memories and special times, and those songs tend to be the ones I play on repeat.

I’m not the only one who has stories associated with songs. At a recent Styx concert, band members would introduce songs by telling stories about what inspired the songs or what was happening when the songs were written. Hearing those anecdotes made me feel closer to the band and its music. Rock legends Tom Petty and Bon Jovi did the same thing, and the stories added so much depth to the show.

Something to think about: How can you incorporate stories into your message to make it more memorable and meaningful?

 

 

Photo credit: Tricia Richards-Service

Aren’t we all speakers?

Aren’t we all speakers? 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

I Need A Speaker is on Clubhouse! Hosted by Tricia Richards-Service and Christopher Pahoski, the room was open for people who want to learn more about getting started in public speaking.

Some people have said, “I’m not a speaker. In fact, I’m rarely in front of an audience.” We responded that the size of the audience isn’t as relevant as the opportunity to deliver value to people.

When you make a presentation in your department meeting … you’re a speaker. When you make a toast at a special occasion … you’re a speaker. When you respond to questions in a job interview … you’re a speaker. If you have a message to share … you’re a speaker.

You get the idea.

Whether we are involved in a one-on-one conversation, a small group meeting, or a conference, we all have the opportunity to collect our thoughts, consider our audience, and deliver value.

 

We’d love to hear examples of how information was powerful because it was shared. Send your stories to info@ineedaspeaker.com.

 

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Public speaking notes from Dale Carnegie

Public speaking notes from Dale Carnegie 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

“Thinking people want to be led, not driven. They want to have the facts presented and to draw their own conclusions. They like to be asked questions, not to have a ceaseless stream of direct statements poured at them.”

— Dale Carnegie, Public Speaking for Success

 

 

We want to lead, not drive. What topics do you want to read about in our blog? E-mail info@ineedaspeaker.com with your suggestions.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Gig worker. Cancel culture. Second gentleman. What do these phrases have in common?

Gig worker. Cancel culture. Second gentleman. What do these phrases have in common? 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Have you figured out what those phrases have in common? They were all among the 520 new terms that were added to the Merriam-Webster dictionary in January 2021. (Read more of them by clicking here.)

Yes, you read that right. In one month, more than 500 new words were added to our constantly changing vocabulary.

With so much rapid change in the way we communicate, it’s more important than ever to define unfamiliar terms.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Enjoy our chat on the TrillMBA podcast

Enjoy our chat on the TrillMBA podcast 2560 1440 I Need A Speaker

Recently, the founder of I Need A Speaker was asked to be a guest on the Trill MBA podcast. Tricia Richards-Service was thrilled to talk with host Felicia Ann Rose Enuha about I Need A Speaker and the power of public speaking.

Click here to listen and learn.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Wonder Woman and Batman do this before they go out. Do you?

Wonder Woman and Batman do this before they go out. Do you? 2560 1567 I Need A Speaker

Years ago, someone gifted me with a bold red blazer that I adored. Cherry red with shiny brass buttons, this double-breasted masterpiece was more than I could afford. I really, really wanted it. My desire went beyond the color. It was the feeling I had when I slid in one arm, then two. The blazer made me feel bolder and more confident, like I could do anything. I was delighted to receive it as a gift.

Aside from the dark hair and sassy attitude, choosing a power outfit for work is one more thing I have in common with Wonder Woman. Even Batman has a go-to outfit for fighting crime.

These outfits are more than clothing. They’re a form of non-verbal communication, making a statement about who you are. They’re a psychological boost – a reason to stand a little taller. They’re part of your personal brand.

Earlier this week, I overheard a conversation about the most appropriate clothing to wear when giving a presentation. Discussion followed about suits versus jeans, and there was debate about business casual being “in the middle.”

Had anyone asked me, I would say, “It depends.”

Consider the event/occasion and the audience. Think about how you want to present yourself: Authoritative. Approachable. Relaxed. And give thought to your topic. Yoga pants might be okay if you’re talking about how to meditate and demonstrating techniques. Creative disciplines may welcome flow dresses and jean jackets.

There is no right answer that will suit everyone (get the pun?), but I do recommend that you find your proverbial red blazer. Choose something that makes you feel confident and sends the right message.

 

Photo credit: DepositPhotos

Check. Check again. And check again.

Check. Check again. And check again. 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

Twice in the last week, I was in meetings where a speaker’s camera wasn’t working. Ouch. That makes it difficult to engage with audiences.

During the pandemic and the meteoric rise in video conferences, many people upgraded their home office equipment to include lighting, cameras, and microphones.

If you’re a speaker for an upcoming conference, class, or meeting, be sure to check your equipment in the space where you plan to use it.

  • Ensure that anything requiring power can be plugged into a power source.
  • Be certain that your settings are where you want them to be.
  • Remove virtual backgrounds that may not be appropriate for the event and audience.
  • Test microphones.

This sounds like common sense advice (and it is), but it always helps to reinforce these practices so your message will be heard as intended.

 

Photo credit: DepositPhotos

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