• Connecting Speakers with Audiences™

speakers

Create a speaker sheet to highlight credentials and results

Create a speaker sheet to highlight credentials and results 1707 2560 I Need A Speaker

To help promote yourself as a speaker, create a one-page speaker sheet. Sometimes known as a “one sheet,” it’s a document that highlights information about your public speaking offerings.

Many speakers hire graphic designers or use an online resource like Canva (www.canva.com) to create an attractive document. Regardless of how it’s developed, here’s what to include:

  • A recent headshot. Although you can have a friend or family member take a photo, we recommend using a professional portrait when possible. Secondary images might show you on a stage, in front of a podium, or interacting with an audience.
  • Summary of your expertise. If you’ve read previous blog posts, you’ll know that we recommend finding a niche and remaining focused on becoming the expert in that specific topic. For example, instead of just saying “mental health,” a professional might list his or her expertise as “trauma-informed spaces” or “dealing with grief after the loss of a spouse.”
  • Related topics on which you can speak, or a list of titles from previous presentations. This allows event planners to determine if your expertise is right for their event and audience.
  • Anticipated results. Include the learning objectives you’ll meet, the value you’ll deliver, or the experience your audience will have. Help event planners imagine the effect you’ll have on your audience. State how the audience will benefit. Will they learn? Laugh? Relate? Feel motivated?
  • Client names and testimonials. This is part of the “social proof” that you’ve got a positive track record. If you specialize with a specific audience (at-risk youth, parents/caregivers, medical professionals, etc.), say so.
  • Links to your personal website and/or social media accounts. When event planners click through to learn more about you, they should find more information on your credibility and expertise. They will also expect to find video clips of your prior speaking engagements.
  • Your contact information. Usually, a phone number and e-mail address are all you need.
  • Optional: fee structure. We recommend you don’t include your fee on your speaker sheet, because the fee may vary, depending on who books you. Some speakers charge less for their alma mater or a non-profit, for example.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

We would love to be your podcast guest!

We would love to be your podcast guest! 1707 2560 I Need A Speaker

We are thrilled to welcome new speakers all the time, and we love to hear their stories. Here are some reasons why people join our global directory:

  • To share a personal, impactful, and meaningful story;
  • To elevate their presence at work;
  • To establish credibility in their field;
  • To demonstrate subject matter expertise in hopes of finding a job;
  • To continue contributing after retirement;
  • To share their love of a particular topic;
  • To meet new people;
  • To help other people deal with specific issues; and
  • To speak out about a cause that’s important to them.

Did you realize that public speaking offers so many benefits? In addition, public speaking supports:

  • researching to remain current on topics;
  • organizing your thoughts;
  • building self-confidence; and
  • writing and editing.

Public speaking is a great topic for a podcast about employment, leadership, marketing, and so many other areas of focus. To book us for your podcast, e-mail tricia@ineedaspeaker.com.

 

Photo credit: Harry Cunningham @harry.digital / Pexels

We’re seeking event planners for interviews

We’re seeking event planners for interviews 1707 2560 I Need A Speaker

It’s Free Membership February*, and we’re ramping up for a fantastic year! (Welcome to the dozens of speakers who joined our global directory this month.)

We are seeking event planners to chat with us about a variety of topics:

  • speaker etiquette
  • meeting planning
  • how to vet speakers
  • how to know when a speaker is right for your group
  • considerations for audience engagement
  • how venue influences tone
  • meeting trends
  • best practices
  • and a lot more!

Interviews may be done by e-mail, phone, or Zoom, and there is no cost to you at all. We just want opportunities to discuss happenings and trends in the speaker event industry.

E-mail tricia@ineedaspeaker.com to schedule a time to chat, and you may be featured in our newsletter.

 

*To join as a speaker during Free Membership February, use code FREEFEB for your free, one-year membership. Offer valid through 2/28/22.

 

 

Photo credit: George Milton / Pexels

Public Speaking Lessons from Ted Lasso

Public Speaking Lessons from Ted Lasso 400 400 I Need A Speaker

Ted Lasso, the lovable coach from the hit show of the same name, is known for his inspirational speeches. His words have motivated a failing team to rally toward victory. Let’s consider what makes his speeches so effective.

Ted Lasso is genuine. He speaks from the heart.

He uses anecdotes to help his audience remember main points.

When speaking, Ted uses eye contact to connect with the people who are listening.

Ted uses language that’s easy to follow.

He smiles and enjoys the process.

What lessons did you learn from watching Ted Lasso?

 

 

Photo credit: Twitter @TedLasso

Free Membership February Offered to Amplify New Voices

Free Membership February Offered to Amplify New Voices 2560 1709 I Need A Speaker

In August 2020, we launched I Need A Speaker for two main reasons. First, we wanted to amplify new voices. Second, we wanted to share information.

Since its launch, I Need A Speaker has grown. Our directory now features speakers from seven countries, and we want to grow the directory even more. We want to change conversations and open minds. We want speakers to know how great it feels to share their ideas and increase their self-confidence. We want to create the go-to directory for event planners to find the perfect speakers for their events.

With these goals in mind, one-year memberships are free this month with the code FREEFEB. This code is transferable and expires February 28, 2022. Feel free to share it with your networks.

Register today. Audiences are waiting to hear what you have to say.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Grab opportunities to improve your skills; registration now open for public speaking workshop

Grab opportunities to improve your skills; registration now open for public speaking workshop 2560 1920 I Need A Speaker

A friend told me that her college-aged son joined his university’s golf team, even though he’s only played a few times. She and I talked about his bravery, his willingness to learn, and his positive attitude.

Some people with powerful, impactful messages may feel that they lack the skills to stand before an audience. What they already have is passion. That can’t be taught. Fortunately, everything else that’s required for an effective presentation can be taught.

That’s why I Need A Speaker has collaborated with New York Speech Coaching to offer a live, interactive public speaking skills workshop.

YOUR HOST: I NEED A SPEAKER

Founded in 2020, I Need A Speaker was established to connect speakers with audiences. The team at I Need A Speaker is on a mission to amplify new voices, and we believe that information is most powerful when it’s shared.

Here’s how it works: Speakers pay a low annual fee to join our searchable directory, and event planners can create free accounts to search for the right speaker for their events.

YOUR INSTRUCTOR: BRENDAN HOUDEK (M.A., CCC-SLP)

Senior Instructor and Head of Corporate Training, New York Speech Coaching Brendan specializes in effective business communication, executive presence, and vocal production. He presents an interactive workshop on authenticity, comfort, and confidence in public speaking. Brendan specializes in helping professionals tell their story effectively regardless of environment.

In addition to his work as a speech coach, Brendan is a NYS-licensed and ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist, specializing in voice and fluency disorders. He is the head of New York Speech Pathology. His in-depth understanding of vocal anatomy and physiology assists his coaching by enabling him to provide speakers with healthy and efficient vocal technique.

Brendan also is a singer, multi-instrumentalist, and voice impressionist, hosting the show Voice Breakdown on YouTube. These skills further enable him to have deep insights into the voice and performance.

Brendan’s clientele consists of individuals and groups from Google, Disney, Forbes, Nasdaq, Deloitte, PricewaterhouseCoopers, Capital One, MetLife, and McGraw-Hill.

WHAT YOU’LL LEARN

In this virtual workshop, prepare to laugh and learn at what one recent attendee at a Disney workshop described as “such a great event … my fingers were getting tired from taking so many notes! New York Speech Coaching obviously has great communicators and orators, but they also have wonderful educators too. One of the best webinars/seminars I’ve ever attended.”

Participants will leave the workshop with strategies to improve:

  • Presentation Skills
  • Eliminating Anxiety
  • Preparation Approach
  • Eliminating Vocal Fillers (such as “um, like, & y’know”)
  • Body Language and Gesticulation
  • Virtual Communication
  • Dynamism and Charisma

Join us for an exhilarating session with immediate takeaways to take your executive presence to the next level!

In order to create the most beneficial participant experience, seating is limited to 25 people.

Click here to register: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/3483428076957249806

 

 

Photo credit: Kindel Media on Pexels

The show must go on

The show must go on 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

“The show must go on” is a saying that’s typically associated with theater. Some sources claim it originated in the circus, when the performers’ belief was that there must be a show, regardless of obstacles.

I thought of that saying about a week ago, when I arrived to speak and technology issues prevented me from accessing my slides.

An IT representative hurried to the room where I was presenting, apologizing several times over. She explained that there was a serious issue with the equipment, and she recommended that my audience and I move to another room.

“No problem,” I assured her. “This room will be fine. The system can be repaired later.”

The woman stared in disbelief and said, “but you can’t access the computer or the slides.”

I assured her that I knew the material, and everything would be fine. And it was.

I relay this story not to demonstrate my bravery, but rather to share the importance of preparation. With printed notes and a few practice runs under my belt, I was ready to go, with or without technical aids.

Pro tips: Know your material. Bring printed or written notes with you. Be confident knowing the show will go on.

 

 

Photo credit: Vidal Balielo Jr. on Pexels

Moving targets make you easy to miss

Moving targets make you easy to miss 2560 1709 I Need A Speaker

Years ago, while the BBC was interviewing a woman on live television, her child interrupted by toddling into the room. Since the pandemic, that’s happened over and over again.

This video is a parody of the original, but the takeaway is the same: when there are distractions, the speaker is no longer the focus. Audience members lose their focus, and they aren’t listening to the speaker’s message.

On virtual meetings, the distractions could range from a passing emergency vehicle to a playful puppy. In face-to-face sessions, distractions may come from the movement of a stage assistant, guest(s) seated on stage, or passersby outside a window.

Your audience members will be distracted when there is movement around you. Eliminate movement as best you can, and keep the focus on you.

Photo credit: Mikhail Nilov on Pexels

Wow! That’s impressive!

Wow! That’s impressive! 1920 2560 I Need A Speaker

In Dale Carnegie’s famous book, Public Speaking for Success, he shares tactics on how to make figures more impressive.

We agree with his advice, and we know it makes figures more memorable, too.

Consider the example he gives in chapter 13:

The Vatican has fifteen thousand rooms.

The Vatican has so many rooms that one might occupy a different one every day for forty years without having lived in them all.

Make it relatable.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

Answer questions before they can be asked

Answer questions before they can be asked 2560 1707 I Need A Speaker

When your presentation content raises questions, your audience will begin thinking more about the questions and less about what you’re saying.

Anticipate what questions your audience will have, and answer them in your presentation. Don’t wait for someone to raise a hand.

 

Photo credit: Pexels

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